American Canine Association

Breeds

Breed Name: Boston Terrier


History

Gaining their breed name, Boston Terriers, this breed was first bred and born in Boston, Massachusetts. Difficult for some people to believe, but this small breed dog was once the average size of an American Pit Bull Terrier, weighing an average of 45 pounds in weight. After years of "Pit fighting" this breed was finally bred down in size using selective breeding methods and is known as the popular family dog and companion that it is known for being today. This breed was created by crossing the English Bulldog bloodlines with the now non-existing English White Terrier.

Appearance

This breed is considered a small breed with males and females measuring 15-17 inches in height and weighing an average of 15-25 pounds in weight. Known for their round shaped head, with two very large eyes to make you fall in love, this breed is built small and athletic. Their two triangular shaped ears should stand firm on the top of their head when cropped, however some have a natural fold 3/4 of the way up. Their single layer coat should always demonstrate a natural shine. Their tail is positioned low and downwards or can be slightly curly near their body. Their coat is available in black and white, brown and white, brindle and seal.

Temperament

A wonderful breed to consider whether you live within the country or apartment settings; the Boston Terrier is a true great catch. This breed is funny, active, vibrant, loyal and loving with its family members. If given enough socialization while young, this breed is very outgoing even with strangers. The Boston Terrier breed truly needs to be treated as part of the family, being included with family trips and events, outdoor activities and household relaxation time to remain happy and healthy, both mentally and physically. When not receiving enough physical and mental activity, this breed will show poor behavior skills such as barking and anxiousness. This breed requires a daily walk along with other playtime. Be sure to show your Boston Terrier rules and boundaries within his or her living space while young, otherwise this breed can develop "small dog syndrome", and become very bossy and be difficult to train. In general this breed is a great choice to add to any family with children and other pets.

Grooming

This breed requires daily brushing and bathing when needed. This breed does shed.

Special Notes

This breed is very sensitive to weather conditions, both cold and hot! Please note that the Boston Terrier breed are prone to many health issues. This breed is not meant for everybody. Please fully educate yourself about this breed prior to adding one to your home. Do not add a Boston Terrier to your household unless you are able to provide life long financial and physical care to your new family member. All dogs originate from wolves (Canis Lupus). Each breed of dog was originally created by mixing different breeds together in an effort to bring forth certain characteristics. Once a breeder has created acceptable “breed characteristics” within their bloodline and these “breed characteristics” have shown to be reliably reproduced in the offspring for three (3) generations, the bloodline may be upgraded from the category of “foundation stock” to “pure-bred”. The same “pure-bred” breed standards vary from different continents, countries, territories, regions, breed clubs, and canine pure-breed registries depending on the goals of their breeders. Dog DNA testing companies can have accurate results for a specific bloodline of a small colony of dogs. However, there are tens of thousands of different bloodlines in the world which have not yet been tested for marker baseline results by Dog DNA testing companies as of 2017. For this reason Dog DNA testing companies do not guarantee the 100% accuracy of their breed lineage results and will also show different marker results for the same pure-bred breed in different continents, countries, territories, regions, breed clubs, and canine pure-breed registries depending on the goals of their breeders.

© 2017 American Canine Association, Inc.