American Canine Association

Breeds

Breed Name: Brussels Griffon


History

The Brussels Griffon was first ever seen within a famous painting in the early 1800's. It is believed that this breed is made up of the Pug, Petit Brabancon, Affenpinscher, English Toy Spaniel, Yorkshire Terrier and other local bloodlines at that time.This breed was used for getting rid of small vermin within homes and farms. Due to their quirky personalities, today they can be seen within many family households as beloved family members!

Appearance

The Brussels Griffon is a very small canine breed, with males and females only measuring 7-8 inches in height and weighing an average of 6-10 pounds in weight. This breed appears very similar to a movie character with their small, broad shaped head, with two large ears standing firmly on top. Their muzzle is small and rectangular and stops suddenly where their tiny nose sits and is either dark brown or black. Their 4 legs are lean and long, as the rest of their body is built very petite, sturdy and lean. The Brussels Griffon has two, large round eyes that are commonly dark brown or black in color. This breed has two types of coats, rough and smooth. They are available in red which includes some black hairs throughout, belge combination, black and tan, red with black mask, and solid black.

Temperament

You can't help but fall in love with this extremely small, quirky and lovable breed. Very similar personality to the Yorkshire Terrier, the Brussels Griffon is very brave, confident, loyal, smart and playful. This breed loves to be included in family activities and relaxation time. The Brussels Griffon will do well in apartment and country living situations. This breed is known for being difficult to potty train, so we recommend a designated potty pad spot within the home, reminders to your pup and regular potty breaks to ensure your home stays clean and as is. This breed requires a confident, patient and consistent owner who only uses positive reinforcement training methods. As all small dogs, early boundaries and rules need to be set within the home when the new dog arrives to prevent an array of behavioral issues later on from "small dog syndrome". A daily walk, as well as playtime within the home for mental and physical exercise is required for this breed. This breed is a wonderful watchdog, and generally does well with other same sized canines as well as other pets he or she grows up around.

Grooming

This breed requires daily brushing and bathing when needed. Regular, professional grooming is highly recommended.

Special Notes

Please note that this breed is extremely sensitive to heat! Temperatures for this breed can be deadly. Please fully educate yourself about the health, care and requirements for the Brussels Griffon prior to adding one to your household to ensure this is the correct breed of choice for you. A properly fitting harness and leash is require for this breed while outdoors at all times to ensure their safety from large birds as well as other common safety concerns. All dogs originate from wolves (Canis Lupus). Each breed of dog was originally created by mixing different breeds together in an effort to bring forth certain characteristics. Once a breeder has created acceptable “breed characteristics” within their bloodline and these “breed characteristics” have shown to be reliably reproduced in the offspring for three (3) generations, the bloodline may be upgraded from the category of “foundation stock” to “pure-bred”. The same “pure-bred” breed standards vary from different continents, countries, territories, regions, breed clubs, and canine pure-breed registries depending on the goals of their breeders. Dog DNA testing companies can have accurate results for a specific bloodline of a small colony of dogs. However, there are tens of thousands of different bloodlines in the world which have not yet been tested for marker baseline results by Dog DNA testing companies as of 2017. For this reason Dog DNA testing companies do not guarantee the 100% accuracy of their breed lineage results and will also show different marker results for the same pure-bred breed in different continents, countries, territories, regions, breed clubs, and canine pure-breed registries depending on the goals of their breeders.

© 2017 American Canine Association, Inc.