American Canine Association

Breeds

Breed Name: Curly-Coated Retriever


History

The Curly Coated Retriever originated in England around the 1800s and was bred solely for hunting waterfowl. Today, this breed is still used for the same purpose.

Appearance

An appearance unlike any other Retriever breed, The Curly Coated Retriever has a very distinct body of curls that it is covered with. Measuring between 25-27 inches in height for both males and females, and weighing in around 55-65 pounds, this retriever breed is quite large. A single layer of tightly formed curls as a coat, is only available in a dark chocolate or black. Thought this breed is built tall, lean and long, they are full of endurance and strength and energy used for its ability to hunt. Two very triangular ears frame their wedge shaped face that tapers off into a scissor bite. Their eyes are round and always a dark brown or black in color, as their nose will be black or brown, matching their coat color. Their coat isn't curly as it appears for no reason, this unique coat repels water along with every thing else this dog comes into contact to while hunting birds on land and in the water. Chocolate colored dogs have the ability to have yellow eyes, although this is a rarity.

Temperament

The Curly Coated Retriever is an excellent match for any person who enjoys endurance exercise and is active outdoors. Requiring a lot of physical and mental activity, this breed is recommended for adult house holds that are active. If this breed receives enough activity, they are able to be calm indoors at night. Please note this breed was bred for, and only knows, how to be a hunter and gun dog, so they are not recommended for everyone. A properly installed fence is highly recommended for this breed to roam within while outdoors. Although this breed is eager to learn, they are known for getting bored while interacting with training lessons when they become too repetitive so be sure to mix up training methods and only use positive reinforcement methods. This breed is recommended for country living.

Grooming

This breed needs to be combed daily to avoid knots and mats from forming in these tight curls, as well as for the coat to be free of any sticks or outside debris. Bathe when needed. This breed sheds heavily every 6 months.

Special Notes

This breed is prone to bloat, cancer, GSD (Glycogen Storage Disease), EIC (Exercise Induced Collapse), heart and eye issues. Please fully educate yourself about this breed prior to adding one to your family to ensure that this is the correct breed for you and that you are able to make a life long commitment to your new pup! A properly fenced in area is highly recommended for your new dog to safely roam free within while outdoors. Do not add a new dog to your household unless you are able to provide life long physical and financial care. All dogs originate from wolves (Canis Lupus). Each breed of dog was originally created by mixing different breeds together in an effort to bring forth certain characteristics. Once a breeder has created acceptable “breed characteristics” within their bloodline and these “breed characteristics” have shown to be reliably reproduced in the offspring for three (3) generations, the bloodline may be upgraded from the category of “foundation stock” to “pure-bred”. The same “pure-bred” breed standards vary from different continents, countries, territories, regions, breed clubs, and canine pure-breed registries depending on the goals of their breeders. Dog DNA testing companies can have accurate results for a specific bloodline of a small colony of dogs. However, there are tens of thousands of different bloodlines in the world which have not yet been tested for marker baseline results by Dog DNA testing companies as of 2017. For this reason Dog DNA testing companies do not guarantee the 100% accuracy of their breed lineage results and will also show different marker results for the same pure-bred breed in different continents, countries, territories, regions, breed clubs, and canine pure-breed registries depending on the goals of their breeders.

© 2017 American Canine Association, Inc.