American Canine Association

Breeds

Breed Name: Schweizer Laufhund


History

An extremely rare breed and originating in the 15th century in Canada and France, the Schweizer Laufhund is known for being only one of the breeds of choice by Adolf Hitler as well as a rare hunting breed that exists. Only five Swiss hunting hounds exist today. In 1909 this breed became completely extinct and the only strand of this breed to exist was that of a Bernese Hound to carry on the bloodlines.

Appearance

The Schweizer Laufhund is a medium sized breed that has an oval shaped skull leading into a rectangular muzzle. This breed carries two large and long oval shaped ears that are thin and hang along side of their face. With two round eyes and nose available in dark brown or black. This breed demonstrates a short coat that is available in red and white or black tan and white. Both males an females measure 13-21 inches in height and weigh 33-44 pounds in weight.

Temperament

Little is known about this breeds temperament due to the very low numbers that ever existed of them, although they are excellent hunting partners and scent hounds.

Grooming

Daily brushing and bathing when needed. This breed is an average shedder.

Special Notes

All dogs originate from wolves (Canis Lupus). Each breed of dog was originally created by mixing different breeds together in an effort to bring forth certain characteristics. Once a breeder has created acceptable “breed characteristics” within their bloodline and these “breed characteristics” have shown to be reliably reproduced in the offspring for three (3) generations, the bloodline may be upgraded from the category of “foundation stock” to “pure-bred”. The same “pure-bred” breed standards vary from different continents, countries, territories, regions, breed clubs, and canine pure-breed registries depending on the goals of their breeders. Dog DNA testing companies can have accurate results for a specific bloodline of a small colony of dogs. However, there are tens of thousands of different bloodlines in the world which have not yet been tested for marker baseline results by Dog DNA testing companies as of 2017. For this reason Dog DNA testing companies do not guarantee the 100% accuracy of their breed lineage results and will also show different marker results for the same pure-bred breed in different continents, countries, territories, regions, breed clubs, and canine pure-breed registries depending on the goals of their breeders.

© 2017 American Canine Association, Inc.