American Canine Association

Breeds

Breed Name: Victorian Bulldog


History

The Victorian Bulldog is a result of great time and dedicated effort to recombine predetermined different breeds of dogs to form a breed with preferred characteristics. The term “Victorian” was used to describe an Bulldog that was synonymous the breed look and characteristics of those found in the 18th and early 19th century. The look is based on paintings and photographs of that era in London, England. Today’s modern day English Bulldog has many hereditary defects. The Victorian Bulldog is a result of “designer” breeding English Bulldogs, Bull Terriers, Bullmastiffs, and Staffordshire Bull Terriers in an attempt to have a dog with a slightly longer and smaller head, longer and straighter legs, and a strong athletic build.

Appearance

The Victorian Bulldog generally taller than the modern day English Bulldog, and has a leaner athletic body structure. This breed doesn’t typically have the hereditary defects generally association with English Bulldogs.

Temperament

The Victorian Bulldog is typically a very loyal and affectionate dog. They enjoy their daily walks. They prefer to be an indoor dog and do not do well in extremely cold or hot weather.

Grooming

It is important to wipe the face with a damp cloth every day giving special attention to clean inside the wrinkles. The breed does not have a heavy undercoat like other breeds of dogs, but does shed. To minimize this comb or brush the dog with a firm bristle brush. Bathing in not recommended more often than one a week.

Special Notes

All dogs originate from wolves (Canis Lupus). Each breed of dog was originally created by mixing different breeds together in an effort to bring forth certain characteristics. Once a breeder has created acceptable “breed characteristics” within their bloodline and these “breed characteristics” have shown to be reliably reproduced in the offspring for three (3) generations, the bloodline may be upgraded from the category of “foundation stock” to “pure-bred”. The same “pure-bred” breed standards vary from different continents, countries, territories, regions, breed clubs, and canine pure-breed registries depending on the goals of their breeders. Dog DNA testing companies can have accurate results for a specific bloodline of a small colony of dogs. However, there are tens of thousands of different bloodlines in the world which have not yet been tested for marker baseline results by Dog DNA testing companies as of 2017. For this reason Dog DNA testing companies do not guarantee the 100% accuracy of their breed lineage results and will also show different marker results for the same pure-bred breed in different continents, countries, territories, regions, breed clubs, and canine pure-breed registries depending on the goals of their breeders.

© 2017 American Canine Association, Inc.