American Canine Association

Breeds

Breed Name: Weimaraner


History

Originally bred as early as the 1600s for hunting large prey such as boar, deer and bears, the Weimaraner eventually became an "all purpose gun dog" used to hunt all types of prey including rabbits and foxes. Though not certain, it is believed that the Weimaraner was created using the Bloodhound and Sleuth Hound bloodlines. Today, this breed is used for hunting, tracking, retrieving, watchdog, agility competitions, search and rescue, government work and pointing.

Appearance

Both males and females measure 22-26 inches in height and weigh 60-70 pounds in weight. Built very tall and lean, this breed is different shades of grey. Their coat is very different than other breeds, as it is extremely short appearing almost as just part of their skin, soft, and carries an extreme shine. Long legs hold up a very small body frame, an oval shaped skull with a rectangular muzzle. Their ears are very large and similar to a pendant shape, while they are thin and frame their face. Weimaraners have two round eyes that are available in amber, light gray and even blue. Their nails are grey or amber in color and their paws are webbed. Commonly, breeders crop their tail approximately 6 inches from the body.

Temperament

Wonderful for a family with children of all ages or elderly that it is able to grow up along side, this breed is not recommended for households with non canine pets or other canines. Weimaraners are known for becoming bored when it comes to training due to their intelligence, so be sure to keep training sessions daily, but short in time and always different. This breed requires a firm, confident and consistent owner who is able to maintain being pack leader at all times. Due to this breed being extremely loyal, loving, and protective, Weimaraners make fantastic guard dogs. This breed requires a daily walk as well as other outdoor activity and mental stimulation otherwise they will become anxious and ill-full behaviors will stem from this. Please note that this breed has a mind similar to a human in the sense that they want to know exactly what is expected of him or her, for how long and when. This breed requires a calm owner and a non stressful household. This breed is suited for both apartment and country living.

Grooming

Brush daily as this breed is an average shedder. Mild soap is highly recommended when it comes time to bathe your Weimaraner. Pay close attention to your dog if he or she is a working dog, for any damage to their skin, paws or inside of their mouth.

Special Notes

Please note this breed is prone to mass cell tumors and bloat. Please fully educate yourself about the Weimaraner prior to adding one to your family to ensure that this breed is the correct breed for you and your family and that you are able to make a life long commitment to your new pup. All dogs originate from wolves (Canis Lupus). Each breed of dog was originally created by mixing different breeds together in an effort to bring forth certain characteristics. Once a breeder has created acceptable “breed characteristics” within their bloodline and these “breed characteristics” have shown to be reliably reproduced in the offspring for three (3) generations, the bloodline may be upgraded from the category of “foundation stock” to “pure-bred”. The same “pure-bred” breed standards vary from different continents, countries, territories, regions, breed clubs, and canine pure-breed registries depending on the goals of their breeders. Dog DNA testing companies can have accurate results for a specific bloodline of a small colony of dogs. However, there are tens of thousands of different bloodlines in the world which have not yet been tested for marker baseline results by Dog DNA testing companies as of 2017. For this reason Dog DNA testing companies do not guarantee the 100% accuracy of their breed lineage results and will also show different marker results for the same pure-bred breed in different continents, countries, territories, regions, breed clubs, and canine pure-breed registries depending on the goals of their breeders.

© 2017 American Canine Association, Inc.