American Canine Association

Breeds

Breed Name: Welsh Terrier


History

Dating back to the late 1800's, the Welsh Terrier was first discovered. This breed originated in Wales and is known for their fly-ball, agility, hunting, tracking and working dog capabilities packed inside a small size breed!

Appearance

The Welsh Terrier is a small breed dog with males and females measuring up to 15 inches in height and weighing an average of 20 pounds in weight. This breed has a long, rectangular shaped head that directly goes into a muzzle almost identical in width. Their two medium sized ears are triangular in shape, and are folded firmly forwards. Their two almond shaped eyes are small in size, and generally a dark brown to black in color. Their general body build is short to the ground, rectangular and active in appearance. Their tail is generally docked to three inches in height and stands up and firm. When left natural, their tail is medium in length, tapers to a point and is held upwards. Their coat is a double layer, slightly harsh to the touch, tight and curly to their skin and is available in black and tan and grizzle with a black jacket marking.

Temperament

The Welsh Terrier is an extremely active and smart breed who requires a fun and active owner or family. Like all Terrier types, the Welsh Terrier is no exception to the Terrier rule; without enough physical and mental daily activity, this breed will be unhappy and start to show bad behaviors. The Welsh Terrier loves learning, being included in daily activity and cannot be locked inside for hours at a time. This breed does wonderful with other canines they grow up with, but due to their natural tacking and hunting traits, they should not be in the same home as non-canine pets. This breed requires a firm, confident, active owner who loves being involved in training and interacting with their dog, as well as someone who can remain pack leader at all times and set rules and boundaries within the home. This breed is known for their love of dog toys, including the interactive types, swimming, fly-ball, competitive obedience, Frisbee, hunting, and tracking. Like all Terrier types, this breed has a habit of digging while outdoors and can be quite a barker.

Grooming

This breed does not shed. Professional grooming is required on average of 4 times a year. Consult your professional groomer for further advice on your Welsh Terrier's coat. Daily brushing and bathing when needed.

Special Notes

Please fully educate yourself about the Welsh Terrier prior to adding one to your family to ensure you are able to provide a life long physical and financial commitment to your new family member. This breed loves chasing and tracking while outdoors, so a properly fenced in yard or properly fitting harness and leash is required while outdoors at all times. This breed is prone to glaucoma. All dogs originate from wolves (Canis Lupus). Each breed of dog was originally created by mixing different breeds together in an effort to bring forth certain characteristics. Once a breeder has created acceptable “breed characteristics” within their bloodline and these “breed characteristics” have shown to be reliably reproduced in the offspring for three (3) generations, the bloodline may be upgraded from the category of “foundation stock” to “pure-bred”. The same “pure-bred” breed standards vary from different continents, countries, territories, regions, breed clubs, and canine pure-breed registries depending on the goals of their breeders. Dog DNA testing companies can have accurate results for a specific bloodline of a small colony of dogs. However, there are tens of thousands of different bloodlines in the world which have not yet been tested for marker baseline results by Dog DNA testing companies as of 2017. For this reason Dog DNA testing companies do not guarantee the 100% accuracy of their breed lineage results and will also show different marker results for the same pure-bred breed in different continents, countries, territories, regions, breed clubs, and canine pure-breed registries depending on the goals of their breeders.

© 2017 American Canine Association, Inc.